This week in links: Apathetic ladies, carpets, and justice

Arist and illustrator Miranda Tacchia’s draws unimpressed, blunt women. Find more of them on her Instagram.

Transgender Thai women continue to be conscripted into army as if they were men, unless they can prove they have “gender identity disorder” as well as having sexual reassignment surgery.

Larry Mantle of AirTalk interviews Carly Mee of SurvJustice and law professor Sherry Colb about “stealthing,” its possible legal consequences, and what this could mean for victims of rape.

SurvJustice is a US-based organisation that advocates for justice for victims of sexual assault, and intimate partner violence.

Vreni’s comic at The Nib details her experience with abortion.

Adam Clark Estes profiles the Portland airport carpet that became a hipster icon.

Jen Deerinwater argues that white feminism fails Native Americans under Trump.

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This week in links: Alt-right male insecurity, Saudi Arabian women, and modern-day slavery

Racist, sexist and sexually insecure is no way to go through life, alt-right dudes.

Kat Blaque explains the GOTCHA!!!! of Saudi Arabian women’s oppression.

David Greene from NPR interviews the Russian LGBT Network’s communications manager and their efforts to evacuate Chechen gay men.

Ayesha Mattu and Nura Maznavi discuss the limitations of white adaptions of Austen’s works, and how they have been co-opted by the alt-right.

Phoenix A. M. Singer explains why the Democrat party has failed to make concrete change for the working class and other marginalised groups..

Alex Tizon describes the life and abuse of his family’s slave, Eudocia Tomas Pulido. See responses here.

David A. Graham argues that Trump’s administration has fallen apart.

Featured image of Eudocia Tomas Pulido, from Alex Tizon’s biographical article. 

 

This week in links: Online humiliation, Miley retires her cheap dreads, and more Beyoncé

Akilah takes a well-aimed jab at Donald Trump’s VOICE program.

Amelia Tait at the New Statesman looks at the disturbing trend of boyfriends humiliating their girlfriends on social media. (Content note: Tait blames the girlfriend in question for ‘allowing’ the degrading to occur)

 

Jagger Blaec examines the gentrification of hip-hop and rap by white musicians, in the face of Miley Cyrus returning to her squeaky clean white “roots.”

George Monbiot breaks down the history of neoliberalism and how it has failed us.

Michael Cragg explains how Beyoncé’s 4 marked the turning point in her career.

Yes, another essay on Lemonade – Rawiya Kameir looks at the political significance of Bey’s latest album.

This week I’ve been listening to 4 and Humanz and I’ve been absolutely living.  is such an underrated album and there are so many absolute bangers. My favourites are Love on Top,  Lay Up Under Me, Countdown, I care, and 1+1, AND Grown Woman which isn’t on Spotify and that breaks my heart.

Featured image from Refinery29

 

 

This week in links: Effective allyship, protest, and Rachel Dolezal strikes again

The brainchild of Leslie Mac, and Marissa Jenae Johnson is the Safety Pin Box, a subscription box designed to give white allies an effective way of supporting racial justice. The proceeds are used to give one-time financial gifts to black women and femmes that are actively campaigning for Black liberation.

Safety pin box

Ijeoma Oluo does the tiring work of interviewing Rachel Dolezal, who has no qualms about dying on her transracial stump.

Zoé Samudzi discusses callout culture and the trivialization of abuse in social justice circles. Click the timestamp to see her thread. Want more? Check out Prefigurology’s post and Restorative Justice.

Jeff Yang at qz.com explains why whitewashing is both racist, and unprofitable.

Nicholas Kristof at The New York Times gives a brief overview of effective protest in the age of Trump.

Christian Picciolini, a former neo-Nazi, explains why white supremacy can’t be ignored into non-existence.