October Favourites

Film

What Happened to Monday (2017) is set in a dystopian future where people are forced to have one child maximum, despite multiple births becoming common. Thanks to this law, seven identical sisters (Noomi Rapace) have been forced into hiding for their entire lives. Each sister gets to leave their home one day per week, disguising themselves as ‘Karen Settman’. I love gritty, dramatic dystopian movies and this (mostly) didn’t disappoint. The only drawback this film had for me is that the sisters are meant to be English, but Rapace’s thick Swedish accent breaks the illusion.

TV

Boku no Hero Academia is a funny, snappy anime about a world where everyone’s a superhero.

I watched Arrested Development for the first time, and it was amazing. My especial favourite is the acclaimed never nude, Tobias.

Youtubers

I fell down a Youtube rabbit hole into the world of beautiful, bug-eyed fish. My favourite is Jennifer Lynx’s Solid Gold Aquatics, a treasure trove of goldfish expertise.

Podcasts

Buzzfeed’s Another Round is a comedy podcast hosted by Heben Nigatu and Tracy Clayton, with a helping of booze and squirrelphobia. Listen to my favourite episode below:

Red Handed is a new true crime podcast that is absolutely riveting. Honestly, all the episodes are good, but the show might not be for you if graphic descriptions of physical and sometimes sexual violence.

Books

Sarah Knight’s The Life Changing Magic of Not Giving A Fuck encourages us all to do just that. Here’s to ignoring the Kardashians!

Featured image from Solid Gold Aquatics.

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Dark side of the moon: Black Women in Wonder Woman Part 2

Welcome to the last installment of my first mini-series!

Here, I’ll be discussing Artemis, played by real-life boxing legend Ann Wolfe.

Artemis is a fierce warrior, second only to Antiope, the leader of Themyscira’s army.

Physical strength isn’t usually celebrated in women – athletes, and regular gym rats are mocked for their appearances, and for ‘looking like men’. Heaven forbid we open a door for ourselves!

Artemis is muscular and athletic, but not unwomanly – her face is framed by her tiara, her armour is more practical than Diana’s little off-the-shoulder number, but is still feminine.

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Alas! My shoulder is my one true weakness!

But I digress.

Again, Artemis’s power isn’t something to fear – it’s something to aspire to.

She’s set up early in the film as the strongest of all the training Amazons, and Diana proves herself by fighting Artemis, mini-boss style, before moving on to Antiope.

I’m not mad about her being hardcore. I’m concerned about the emotional stoicism she shows in her first appearances. Artemis doesn’t even flinch after getting wapped by some cowardly sneak attack – she just turns right around and gets on with her business. While admirable on the surface, this is a major aspect of the ‘strong black woman’ trope. Mel Perez, writing for Blackgirlnerds.com, dissects this trope and why it’s harmful:

“A strong, black woman is almost superhuman. She bears crippling burdens without a complaint. She nurtures everyone around her and fights for them. She weathers both physical and mental pain and comes through, intact on the other side…Perhaps, instead of superhuman, a better way to describe her is that she is barely human. This is the problem with this descriptor — it strips away our humanity. It makes it so that we’re not allowed to break down. We swallow our pain and try to ignore how we’re choking on it.”

Praising black women for their ability to quietly withstand pain is “a trap that keeps us from being able to express how these negative situations truly affect us.”

Fortunately, while Artemis totters precariously around becoming the “strong black woman,” she breaks through these barriers the next few times we see her. (I guess by the time she appeared on screen, the filmmakers were already preoccupied with pigeonholing Diana’s sitter).

Yes, she’s used to further Diana’s character development (and only as a mini boss)…Yes, she only has one line…

BUT!

At least for a moment, we see her existing outside of the white protagonists’. When she fights alongside the other Amazons to protect their home, we see her being as frightened and upset as the others as they decide what to do with Steve Trevor. The mask we see her using in the first fight slips, and she’s allowed what the strong black woman isn’t – vulnerability.

So, hardly a homerun, but not absolutely shit.

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And so I couldn’t help but wonder…what if Hollywood took black women seriously?

Again, I really wish they’d done more with this character. What if Ann Wolfe and Robin Wright had switched places? The island’s most powerful warrior would make much more sense as a real-life athlete instead of somebody that, while lovely, is the Ancient Greek equivalent of a dried up old stick with a bad accent.

And speaking of unmuscular, slender women warriors – my next post (Wo)Men in Tights: Femininity in Wonder Woman will cover even more of this wonderful hot mess of a film. See you soon!

More on this

Monique Jones looks at women of colour in Wonder Woman‘s comic book history.

At Everyday Feminism, Kesiena Boom discusses four prominent misogynoirist tropes.

Also, what is misogynoir?

Ann Wolfe reveals how she got cast as Artemis, and discusses her career with The Ringer.

Disclaimer

I’m a white woman. I wrote this mini-series in the hopes that I could help other white women, and non-black women understand the problematic ways black women are represented in this film. If you’re a black woman and you disagree, or you just want to share your thoughts, please feel free to contact me either in the comment section or via my blog’s contact page. Comments are all moderated by me, and I endeavour to make this blog a place where people of all marginalized groups feel they can safely express their views.

Featured image from Comicbook.com. Others are from Comicbookmovie.com, and Thegloss.com respectively.

 

May favourites

I’ve been listening  to The Emancipation of Mimi and 4 non-stop this month. When are Mimi and Bey going to collab tho?

Designated Survivor is a tense, fast-paced show concerning an alternate America where almost all of congress has been murdered in a terrorist attack, and one man with no political experience finds himself becoming president in the aftermath.

Chef’s Table profiles a different chef in each episode, from the eccentric (Magnus Nilsson – why do you want us to eat moss??) to those that actually seem to make good food (Ivan Orkin’s ramen dishes). As a latina, the chefs that really stuck out to me were Alex Atala, and Virgilio Martínez. Seeing their countries, and national cuisine being treated with such love, and care by these chefs was a wonderful change to the pitying narratives usually shown in the media.

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Virgilio’s quinua con colinabo y cebolla perla

I watched Perfect Blue after seeing Super Eyepatch Wolf’s video essay discussing it, and I was absolutely floored. If you like psychological thrillers, this is for you.

For fellow nerds that are currently stuck without a roleplaying group, I recommend The Adventure Zone –  a podcat hosted the McElroy brothers, and their dad play D&D every other week.

Imrie and Satia are two black British women that host Melanin Millenials, a topical podcast packed with clever debate, sideeyes, and salt to taste.

Emma Donoghue’s 2010 novel Room explores the reality of a young boy, who has been trapped inside a single room with his mother for his entire life.

Imani Perry’s More Beautiful and More Terrible discusses the enduring anti-black racism of America, and encourages us to thoughtfully continue our activism.

bell hook’s seminal The Will to Change argues for the importance of including men, and boys (especially those of colour) in feminism in order for true progress to be made.

Ijeoma Oluo is an incisive, intersectional feminist writer. You can find her work here.

I’ve recently finished reading the Luna brothers’ Girls and Ultra comics – the storytelling is fascinating, even if the art tends to be flat.

PKSparkxx’s Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild playthrough continues to be something I look forward to every week.

Nyappicat’s dance covers are AMAZING and definitely worth checking out. Full disclosure: she’s my best friend so I’m only a tiny bit biased.

Featured image from Mariah’s instagram.