This week in links: Wheelchair burlesque, terrible art, and floating asexual islands

Jacqueline Boxx, aka Miss Disa-Burly-Tease, is a burlesque performer that dances in her wheelchair. See her performances here.

Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture‘s “Regionalism, Regional Identity, and Queer Asian Cinema” edition is available online here.

Richard Spencer’s podcast, Vanguard Radio, has been banned from Soundcloud.

And finally, have some dreadful fanfiction.

This week in links: More Handmaid’s Tale thinkpieces, and some good old-fashioned hating

Hello, friends! Let us mourn the death of LGBT+ and black culture under Katy Perry as she attempts to reinvent herself.

Max S. Gordon argues that The Handmaid’s Tale describes a black woman’s experience under the guise of a white handmaid.

Mari Yamamoto and Jake Adelstein discuss how the Japanese government under prime minister Shinzo Abe is institutionalizing his love of fascism.

Candace Bond-Theriault proclaims her sexuality in the face of bi-erasure.

Life After Hate is an organisation that seeks to help individuals leaving hate groups.

And in this week’s spirit of hating celebrities, “if Pewdiepie is Youtube’s top talent, we are all doomed.”

And finally, I’m going to try and start publishing a new article every Wednesday. See you soon!

 

 

This week in links: Apathetic ladies, carpets, and justice

Arist and illustrator Miranda Tacchia’s draws unimpressed, blunt women. Find more of them on her Instagram.

Transgender Thai women continue to be conscripted into army as if they were men, unless they can prove they have “gender identity disorder” as well as having sexual reassignment surgery.

Larry Mantle of AirTalk interviews Carly Mee of SurvJustice and law professor Sherry Colb about “stealthing,” its possible legal consequences, and what this could mean for victims of rape.

SurvJustice is a US-based organisation that advocates for justice for victims of sexual assault, and intimate partner violence.

Vreni’s comic at The Nib details her experience with abortion.

Adam Clark Estes profiles the Portland airport carpet that became a hipster icon.

Jen Deerinwater argues that white feminism fails Native Americans under Trump.

This week in links: Presidential dummies, white feminist dystopias, and creepy girl groups

David A. Graham contests that foreign leaders have realised Trump is a pushover, and reveals that Trump has no interest in becoming less ignorant.  Albert Burneko goes a step further, and calls Trump an idiot.

Brian Ashcraft looks at the history, and current use of blackface in Japan, alongside Japanese artists’ use of music styles created by African Americans.

Anime Feminist asks their readers how they feel about Japanese boy bands and girlgroups.

Carly Findlay is an Australian woman with Ichthyosis, whose work focuses on disabilities and appearance discrimination.

Ana Cottle argues that argues that Hulu’s adaption of The Handmaid’s Tale is a white feminist dystopia.

Laurie Penny decries white men using Islamophobia to derail debates about sexism in their own countries.

Featured image from ComingSoon.com 

This week in links: Alt-right male insecurity, Saudi Arabian women, and modern-day slavery

Racist, sexist and sexually insecure is no way to go through life, alt-right dudes.

Kat Blaque explains the GOTCHA!!!! of Saudi Arabian women’s oppression.

David Greene from NPR interviews the Russian LGBT Network’s communications manager and their efforts to evacuate Chechen gay men.

Ayesha Mattu and Nura Maznavi discuss the limitations of white adaptions of Austen’s works, and how they have been co-opted by the alt-right.

Phoenix A. M. Singer explains why the Democrat party has failed to make concrete change for the working class and other marginalised groups..

Alex Tizon describes the life and abuse of his family’s slave, Eudocia Tomas Pulido. See responses here.

David A. Graham argues that Trump’s administration has fallen apart.

Featured image of Eudocia Tomas Pulido, from Alex Tizon’s biographical article. 

 

This week in links: Meninists, true crime, and social dance

Alison Willmore discusses the self-referential documentary Casting JonBenét and how it criticizes the prying view that audiences love so much.

William Finley’s experience at Fyre Festival.

Pink News is Britain’s main LGBT+ news site.

Adam Serwer and Katie J. M. Baker interview men’s rights leader Paul Elam’s daughter and ex-wives, and describe how he “turned being a deadbeat dad into a money-making movement.”

Captain Andy explains why Laci Green taking the red pill is an uncritical appeal for the inherent goodness of bigots.

Study shows that telling LGBT+ children “it gets better” is a complete cop-out.

Featured image by Jonathan Rodriguez for BuzzFeed News

 

 

This week in links: Online humiliation, Miley retires her cheap dreads, and more Beyoncé

Akilah takes a well-aimed jab at Donald Trump’s VOICE program.

Amelia Tait at the New Statesman looks at the disturbing trend of boyfriends humiliating their girlfriends on social media. (Content note: Tait blames the girlfriend in question for ‘allowing’ the degrading to occur)

 

Jagger Blaec examines the gentrification of hip-hop and rap by white musicians, in the face of Miley Cyrus returning to her squeaky clean white “roots.”

George Monbiot breaks down the history of neoliberalism and how it has failed us.

Michael Cragg explains how Beyoncé’s 4 marked the turning point in her career.

Yes, another essay on Lemonade – Rawiya Kameir looks at the political significance of Bey’s latest album.

This week I’ve been listening to 4 and Humanz and I’ve been absolutely living.  is such an underrated album and there are so many absolute bangers. My favourites are Love on Top,  Lay Up Under Me, Countdown, I care, and 1+1, AND Grown Woman which isn’t on Spotify and that breaks my heart.

Featured image from Refinery29

 

 

This week in links: good hair, Bernie Sanders, and Handmaids

Marcus H. Johnson argues that the white left continues to not meet black people’s needs and expectations, and that this led to Bernie Sanders’ loss. Interestingly, he also notes that white leftists spout similar rhetoric as the white right.

Kim Kimble, one of Beyoncé’s hair stylists, talks through the different looks she and her team created for Lemonade.

Pop Culture Detective analyses a pedophilic trope he calls ‘Born Sexy Yesterday,’ which involves women with adult bodies but the mind of a child, and their sexualization. Unsurprisingly, he gets much less hate than Feminist Frequency.

Anne Thériault explains why staying alive when you’re suicidal is the most selfless thing you can do.

Margaret Atwood discusses being haunted by The Handmaid’s Tale  and what her novel means in the age of Trump.

Olayemi Olurin explains all the different excuses men will use to not take you seriously.

Cover image from Elle.

This week in links: music, care packages, hipsters, and misogynist women

Being Mankind is an organisation that tries to help boys and young men break gender stereotypes by showcasing non-toxic masculinity. Men of colour, and disabled mens are also highlighted in this project!

Rollin Bishop looks at anime’s optimism.

The Spoonie Essentials Box is a monthly subscription box for people with chronic illnesses.

Sarah Jones looks at the women that love, and build the patriarchy ahead of the Handmaid’s Tale TV adaption.

Cleffer Notes makes orchestral covers of Zelda themes.

July Westhale discusses hipsters and how they have appropriated poverty.

Feminist Frequency is back!

Finally, Amber Galloway Gallego describes how she’s adapted American Sign Language to interpret music.

Featured image from @sabretoothe on Twitter

This week in links: Effective allyship, protest, and Rachel Dolezal strikes again

The brainchild of Leslie Mac, and Marissa Jenae Johnson is the Safety Pin Box, a subscription box designed to give white allies an effective way of supporting racial justice. The proceeds are used to give one-time financial gifts to black women and femmes that are actively campaigning for Black liberation.

Safety pin box

Ijeoma Oluo does the tiring work of interviewing Rachel Dolezal, who has no qualms about dying on her transracial stump.

Zoé Samudzi discusses callout culture and the trivialization of abuse in social justice circles. Click the timestamp to see her thread. Want more? Check out Prefigurology’s post and Restorative Justice.

Jeff Yang at qz.com explains why whitewashing is both racist, and unprofitable.

Nicholas Kristof at The New York Times gives a brief overview of effective protest in the age of Trump.

Christian Picciolini, a former neo-Nazi, explains why white supremacy can’t be ignored into non-existence.