This Week in Links: Subverting stereotypes, and real Korean cooking

Elizabeth Gabrielle Lee‘s latest photobook, XING, mimics and subverts stereotypes about east and south-east Asian women. She notes that

“The association between sex, sexuality and Asian women is almost inseparable – that’s not to say that it is wrong to consider Asian women as an attractive being, but it is more so the lack of agency that the Asian female is devoid of.”

Maangchi, aka Emily Kim, is a Korean chef that uses Youtube to make Korean cuisine more accessible. Watch her talk at Google below.

Folding Ideas analyses toxic masculinity in Fight Club.

Robert Chapman sheds light on the increased risks for autistic adults to become victims of domestic abuse.

White woman Barbara Harris targets women of colour addicted to drugs and pays them cash to get birth control. But it doesn’t stop there, folks! She pays them a lump sum of $300 to get sterilized. Modern day eugenics, anyone?

Director of First They Killed my Father, Angelina Jolie and her casting crew admit to taunting poor children with money in order to “garner raw emotion” from them.

This Week in Links: The new Dolezal, corporate feminism, and being called exotic

Torre DeRoche describes what happened when she broke up with her partner…after writing a memoir about their relationship.

Solange speaks with her mum, Tina, and writer Judnick Mayard about A Seat at the Table.

I’ve hated The Secret since I was a kid. Mark Manson made the sacrifice of explaining why it’s terrible.

Former CEO of Thinx accused of sexually harassing her employees.

Irritating white man wishes he would be seen as Chinese. Kimberley Yam encourages him to take a seat.

At Asian American Comic Con, panelists discuss how they deal with being exoticized.

Image from Pri.org

 

This Week in Links: All-American Ancient Greeks, care homes, and anti-Asian racism

After looking into production details, Screen Rant predicts that the Wonder Woman sequel will centre around the Cold War. And in WW3, Diana takes off for Iraq!

Reply All’s latest episode explains how care homes fail the elderly, and how it can be fixed.

RMJ describes the construction of fat women in Mad Men.

Raul of Turma de Vovo Raul mocks K-Pop group KARD, and invites the audience to join him in making racist jokes. They do.

 

This week in links: Erotica, real trans media, and 90s black girl magic

Jessica Slane reviews Rocky Flintstone’s debut novel, Belinda Blinked

Tired of seeing trans people’s stories erased and stolen for profit? More Than T is a documentary that interviews 7 trans and gender-non-conforming people. Watch the trailer below.

BBC’s documentary Q***r Britain  follows LGBT+ culture and strife in the United Kingdom.

I was a huge fan of Daria back in the first few years of high school. Buzzfeed’s Cocoa Butter analyses Jodie Langdon’s character, and the way she comments on the systemic racism.

I love a good video essay even more than I love a shitty Disney movie. Let the unnecessary analysis begin!

Created by Alex Nguyen, and edited by Chau Bui, this video essay analyses the role of Asian men on American television.

Heather Alexandra interviews creators of knock-off Amiibo’s, and their reasons for doing so.

Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s twins, Rumi and Sir Carter, turned a month old this Friday. Congratulations!!!!!!!

Featured image from Beyoncé’s Instagram.

 

This week in links: Bad satire, education, and kitchenware

Clarkisha Kent notes the irony of Sofia Coppola’s erasure of black women in her film adaptation of The Beguiled in an attempt to focus on “gender dynamics…not racial ones.”

Want to accuse women you don’t like of exclusionary white feminism? Hard Times has a handy guide.

Lydia Brown is an autistic disability activist and educator. See their work here.

Did you miss Belinda Blumenthal’s amazing keynote speech at the O2? She’s got you.

The Toronto Police make a heart-felt plea to be let back into Pride.

Alex Santaso explains the origin of some common English idioms.

 

This week in links: Self-obsessed Tsarinas, British culture, and a tad more Wonder Woman

Sometimes being estranged from your family can save your life. Jennifer Neal explains why.

For Father’s Day this year, Jay-Z supports organisations that post bail for men that are trapped inside America’s “exploitative jail industry.”

This year marks the centenary of the Russian revolution. My favourite article from Exeter University’s journal The Historian commemorating this event analyses the Tsarina’s role in the destruction of the Romanov empire.

On the second Friday of August, a man in South Queensferry covers himself in burrs and walks across town to bring the town good luck. Meet your friendly neighbourhood Burryman!

And finally, keeping in theme with my first mini-series:

Featured image Queensferry.net

This week in links: Wheelchair burlesque, terrible art, and floating asexual islands

Jacqueline Boxx, aka Miss Disa-Burly-Tease, is a burlesque performer that dances in her wheelchair. See her performances here.

Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture‘s “Regionalism, Regional Identity, and Queer Asian Cinema” edition is available online here.

Richard Spencer’s podcast, Vanguard Radio, has been banned from Soundcloud.

And finally, have some dreadful fanfiction.

This week in links: More Handmaid’s Tale thinkpieces, and some good old-fashioned hating

Hello, friends! Let us mourn the death of LGBT+ and black culture under Katy Perry as she attempts to reinvent herself.

Max S. Gordon argues that The Handmaid’s Tale describes a black woman’s experience under the guise of a white handmaid.

Mari Yamamoto and Jake Adelstein discuss how the Japanese government under prime minister Shinzo Abe is institutionalizing his love of fascism.

Candace Bond-Theriault proclaims her sexuality in the face of bi-erasure.

Life After Hate is an organisation that seeks to help individuals leaving hate groups.

And in this week’s spirit of hating celebrities, “if Pewdiepie is Youtube’s top talent, we are all doomed.”

And finally, I’m going to try and start publishing a new article every Wednesday. See you soon!

 

 

This week in links: Apathetic ladies, carpets, and justice

Arist and illustrator Miranda Tacchia’s draws unimpressed, blunt women. Find more of them on her Instagram.

Transgender Thai women continue to be conscripted into army as if they were men, unless they can prove they have “gender identity disorder” as well as having sexual reassignment surgery.

Larry Mantle of AirTalk interviews Carly Mee of SurvJustice and law professor Sherry Colb about “stealthing,” its possible legal consequences, and what this could mean for victims of rape.

SurvJustice is a US-based organisation that advocates for justice for victims of sexual assault, and intimate partner violence.

Vreni’s comic at The Nib details her experience with abortion.

Adam Clark Estes profiles the Portland airport carpet that became a hipster icon.

Jen Deerinwater argues that white feminism fails Native Americans under Trump.

This week in links: Presidential dummies, white feminist dystopias, and creepy girl groups

David A. Graham contests that foreign leaders have realised Trump is a pushover, and reveals that Trump has no interest in becoming less ignorant.  Albert Burneko goes a step further, and calls Trump an idiot.

Brian Ashcraft looks at the history, and current use of blackface in Japan, alongside Japanese artists’ use of music styles created by African Americans.

Anime Feminist asks their readers how they feel about Japanese boy bands and girlgroups.

Carly Findlay is an Australian woman with Ichthyosis, whose work focuses on disabilities and appearance discrimination.

Ana Cottle argues that argues that Hulu’s adaption of The Handmaid’s Tale is a white feminist dystopia.

Laurie Penny decries white men using Islamophobia to derail debates about sexism in their own countries.

Featured image from ComingSoon.com